In the tourism market, it is destinations that compete, not individual firms [Ritchie, J. R. B., & Crounch, G. I. (2000). The competitive destination: A sustainable perspective. Tourism Management, 21(SI), 1–7]. Growing competition, both national and international, is making this more and more apparent. In fact, every destination (defined here as tourist district) has to position its products in such a way that gives them character and personality. The traditional fragmented structure of the European market has spurred the development of metamanagement organizations called destination management organizations (DMOs). Today, DMOs are called on to play a critical role: to help local firms build sustainable competitive advantage and to create competitive advantage for the entire district through positioning choices. This paper proposes a dynamic model of destination management (DDMM) which identifies typical metamanagement processes a DMO can use to shape district strategy. The usefulness of this work can be seen not only in the need to formulate a ‘‘good strategy’’, which is often described in terms of positioning or criticality (strategy content), but also a method or a path that enables firms to build that positioning or acquire that criticality (strategy process). In fact, Kaplan and Norton [(2001). The strategy focused organization. How balanced scorecard companies thrive in the new business environment. HBS Press] note that the ability to implement a strategy is more important than the quality of the strategy itself. The model proposed here, consistent with the empirical evidence gathered in multiple longitudinal case studies, underscores the criticality of two different types of metamanagement processes: (i) a series of operative activies, here defined as primary processes, which can shape the resources of the district and serve to create, supply, and communicate local product systems, and (ii) a series of support processes, which can provide the ‘‘glue’’ between various players (public and private, profit and non-profit, entrepreneurs and community) that operate within the district. If these processes are effectively managed, they have a significant impact on the competitive advantage of the firms operating in the tourist district.

From Contents to Processes: Versus a Dynamic Destination Management Model (DDMM), 2006.

From Contents to Processes: Versus a Dynamic Destination Management Model (DDMM)

Sainaghi, Ruggero
2006

Abstract

In the tourism market, it is destinations that compete, not individual firms [Ritchie, J. R. B., & Crounch, G. I. (2000). The competitive destination: A sustainable perspective. Tourism Management, 21(SI), 1–7]. Growing competition, both national and international, is making this more and more apparent. In fact, every destination (defined here as tourist district) has to position its products in such a way that gives them character and personality. The traditional fragmented structure of the European market has spurred the development of metamanagement organizations called destination management organizations (DMOs). Today, DMOs are called on to play a critical role: to help local firms build sustainable competitive advantage and to create competitive advantage for the entire district through positioning choices. This paper proposes a dynamic model of destination management (DDMM) which identifies typical metamanagement processes a DMO can use to shape district strategy. The usefulness of this work can be seen not only in the need to formulate a ‘‘good strategy’’, which is often described in terms of positioning or criticality (strategy content), but also a method or a path that enables firms to build that positioning or acquire that criticality (strategy process). In fact, Kaplan and Norton [(2001). The strategy focused organization. How balanced scorecard companies thrive in the new business environment. HBS Press] note that the ability to implement a strategy is more important than the quality of the strategy itself. The model proposed here, consistent with the empirical evidence gathered in multiple longitudinal case studies, underscores the criticality of two different types of metamanagement processes: (i) a series of operative activies, here defined as primary processes, which can shape the resources of the district and serve to create, supply, and communicate local product systems, and (ii) a series of support processes, which can provide the ‘‘glue’’ between various players (public and private, profit and non-profit, entrepreneurs and community) that operate within the district. If these processes are effectively managed, they have a significant impact on the competitive advantage of the firms operating in the tourist district.
Inglese
Elsevier
27
6
1053
1063
internazionale
con referee
con ISI Impact Factor
Settore SECS-P/07 - Economia Aziendale
1
File in questo prodotto:
Non ci sono file associati a questo prodotto.

I documenti in IRIS sono protetti da copyright e tutti i diritti sono riservati, salvo diversa indicazione.

Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/10808/65
Citazioni
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.pmc??? ND
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.isi??? ND
social impact