Can a material object refer to the divine without attracting to itself devotion and veneration? And, in particular, can a depiction call to mind a reality that subtracts itself from its materiality? There are thus two problems here: whether the divine (God and what pertains to Him) can be rightly said to be represented by an object and whether, in any case, such an object runs the risk of becoming an idol, a little God, an imitation of God. The paper concentrates on a particularly important and not much known work regarding the status of images: the so-called Libri Carolini (792-3). This article presents the first translation in a modern language of the 120 tituli-abstracts of the four books. With all the Platonic-Augustinian suspicion of fictions, the Libri Carolini apportions to images the sole role of bringing to mind the materiality of what is represented thus denying the power of referring to the supersensible: paradoxically, the more an image is “true” and the greater the similarity between the image and its object, the greater is its freight of falsity, insofar as it increases the deception worked on the spectator. The ideas of the Carolingian court cannot be divorced from an artistic production that tended ever more to disconnect a precise meaning from the images made in stone or with the brush, and in due course increasingly regarded sacred history as a pretext for proposing imagines formosae.

I Libri Carolini: da un errore di traduzione nuovi sensi per l'immagine, 2006.

I Libri Carolini: da un errore di traduzione nuovi sensi per l'immagine

BETTETINI, MARIA TILDE
2006

Abstract

Can a material object refer to the divine without attracting to itself devotion and veneration? And, in particular, can a depiction call to mind a reality that subtracts itself from its materiality? There are thus two problems here: whether the divine (God and what pertains to Him) can be rightly said to be represented by an object and whether, in any case, such an object runs the risk of becoming an idol, a little God, an imitation of God. The paper concentrates on a particularly important and not much known work regarding the status of images: the so-called Libri Carolini (792-3). This article presents the first translation in a modern language of the 120 tituli-abstracts of the four books. With all the Platonic-Augustinian suspicion of fictions, the Libri Carolini apportions to images the sole role of bringing to mind the materiality of what is represented thus denying the power of referring to the supersensible: paradoxically, the more an image is “true” and the greater the similarity between the image and its object, the greater is its freight of falsity, insofar as it increases the deception worked on the spectator. The ideas of the Carolingian court cannot be divorced from an artistic production that tended ever more to disconnect a precise meaning from the images made in stone or with the brush, and in due course increasingly regarded sacred history as a pretext for proposing imagines formosae.
Italiano
VS
102
65
112
48
Italy
internazionale
esperti anonimi
senza ISI Impact Factor
A stampa
Settore M-FIL/06 - Storia della Filosofia
1
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/10808/2274
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